Living with ADHD: How to create your own happy place during the COVID19 pandemic

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With the craziness of the world right now, it can feel pretty overwhelming.  The change of routine, the uncertainty, the worry, being out of control. It’s enough to cause anyone to feel overwhelmed and anxious.  But even more so when living with ADHD.  

It’s so important not to let stress and anxiety take over our daily lives.  Not only does it affect our immune system, but it can exacerbate ADHD symptoms and cofactors.  Here is how to create your own happy place during the COVID19 pandemic.

Let off steam

Many of us are now juggling working from home around schooling our children.  Its an endless juggle and can be so difficult living and working in the same space 24/7.  So, it’s important to have some time to let off some steam. Whether it’s blasting some music, dancing around the kitchen, jumping and shouting around – whatever helps you to let loose in some way!

Recharge your batteries

Even though life may have slowed in that we aren’t rushing about here and there, we still need time to recharge our batteries.  We’re still busy juggling everyday life, in a different way. We forget about ourselves, our mental wellbeing and the fact we still need to reset and recharge.  So, why not take a nap, a relaxing bath, watch TV, meditate or maybe read a book. Do something you enjoy but helps you to relax to help you to feel rejuvenated.  

Choose healthy fixations

Some ADHDers find they have obsessive tendencies where they become fixated on specific things.  It’s very easy to then fall into bad habits and become obsessed with things that aren’t good for us.  Whether it’s alcohol, cigarettes, junk food or sugary treats. Try to focus your obsessive nature onto healthier alternatives and create new healthy habits.  Whether it’s working out regularly, eating healthier foods, practising some mindfulness, reading or listening to music.  

Understand triggers and mood changes

Understanding what causes low moods or feelings of stress and overwhelm can really help with managing feelings and emotions.  By understanding how our brains work, we can try to avoid, distract or adapt to our triggers. 

Exercise regularly

Exercise is so good for our physical and mental wellbeing.  When we workout, we release good feeling hormones into our bodies.  After working out, it gives us the boost we need. And the more often we are exercising, the more and longer we will experience these good feelings.

Get 8 hours sleep

I talk about the importance of sleep a lot because it has such a big impact on our daily lives when we don’t get enough.  When we sleep, this is a chance for us to recharge our batteries, but also allows our bodies and our brain the chance to heal and rest, as well as process all of the worries we have had in the day.   Getting enough sleep each night also helps with reducing feelings of stress and overwhelm.

Connect with others

We are a very social species, even if we don’t feel particularly sociable.  We still need human interaction. To build, grow and maintain relationships.  It’s key to our own wellbeing and development. Obviously, in our current lockdown situation, this isn’t so easy as going out to see someone.  But, living in a digital age means we have phones to call, text and video call with others. There are also a number of online groups and classes where you can engage and connect with others through the power of social media. 

If you want to find inner peace and happiness, why not get in touch to find out how I could help you find acceptance, balance, harmony and tranquillity, allowing you to start living your best life.  You can contact me here or click here to book in for your assessment consultation now.